eMailMax 4/26/14 : Page 1

ECRWSS Local Postal Customer See Our Ad on Page 10 April 26, 2014 Paper. News Good our Y www.MailMaxOnline.com a year-and-a-half ago, Chef Sam and Denise returned to the scene with the Grateful Diner, a tiny, but bright and colorful eatery and catering business at 801 W. Buffalo Street in New Buffalo . Serving breakfast and lunch exclusively, Team Luna is striving to maintain their roots by working to stay as local as possible in the farm-to-table genre. As Denise told the Harbor Country News early last year, the Grateful Diner is not only a tribute to Sam’s favorite band, but it’s also a nod to their POSTMASTER: Please deliver on April 26, 2014 Moody on The Market Volume 15, Ver. 17 MOODY Continued from page 1 A fter “eight incredible years,” the owner and operator of a boutique winery on a 65-acre estate in Buchanan will “ press the pause button on our winemaking.” With five vintages under their belt, Vintners David Maki and Dannielle Alphonse and Winemaker Cornel Olivier are stepping back from winemaking at Old Shore Vineyards as they “take time to digest next steps.” Old Shore Vineyard first planted the vines eight years ago at the farmstead and vineyards on a 65-acre estate at 264 Browntown Road in Buchanan. In 2006 the vineyard was established with the planting of 7,000 Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir vines. In a Facebook post on the evening of April 15th, David & Dannielle announced to friends and fans the decision. Their state-ment said, “What a joy it has been to be part of such an incredible industry and share our passions and labor of love with each of you. Eight years ago, when planting the vines of Old Shore, we couldn’t have dreamed of a more memorable experience ahead. Beginning with the mentorship from our peers in the Michigan wine industry and beyond, to the pursuit of viticulture and enology education --each experience has invigorated us from the ground up. With five vintages under our belt, we have made the decision to press the pause button on our winemaking. The vineyards will continue to be in full-swing as we take time to digest next steps. We will continue to support the Michigan wine industry, its growth, and our peers who are dedicated to produce premium wines within our state. Old Shore is proud to have made a positive imprint with our boutique, small-lot productions during this critical industry growth period and remain passionate about the future! Thank you, OSV friends, for your loyal support over the years and for bringing Old Shore wine to your table. It has been an honor to experience this journey with you. Be inspired. Go explore.” Old Shore has a very small quan-tity of the 2011 vintage left and they are also releasing their last boutique production; the 2012 vintage. Driven by the “pause button,” they are offering 20% of on all 2011 vintage full-case purchases and 10% off full-case purchases of the newly released 2012 wines. It could be your final opportunity to purchase. Here is a link to their online sales opportunity: https://www.wineweb. com/scripts/secure/order.cfm/oldshore The Harbor Country restaurant once character-ized by one of its owners as “A four-year dinner party,” will re-emerge anew in the coming weeks, to re-fill a popular hole in the culinary line-up of Sawyer that once was the Soe Cafe . It will then complement its sister property, the Grateful Diner . Hang on, because this will get a bit complicated. Back in the beginning, a place called Mesa Luna , owned and operated by Chef Sam Luna and his wife Denise , took over the space once home to The Grille on Elm at 13 S. Elm Street in downtown Three Oaks . Their new offering at that time introduced Three Oaks to an exciting, but pricey, and eclectic menu that capitalized on local growers and providers for a true farm-to-table experience. That was back in 2005 and 2006. Eventually, the restaurant proved to be a little too-much of a fine dining experi-ence for a small town, and the couple bailed on the concept after what Denise jokingly called “a four year dinner party,” to make way for a different dream. About M oody Pat gratitude for the sun, seed, soil, farmers, lake and cus-tomers that make such a diner possible. Now that they have settled into a groove at the Diner, Sam & Denise are capitalizing on the departure late last summer of the Soe Cafe in Sawyer to round out their service with a dinner restaurant. When they’re not busy working the Diner, they and their colleagues are busy piecing together plans for the return of Mesa Luna . It appears that chapter two for Mesa Luna will be largely dinner service and weekend brunch plans. I’ve been tracking their online postings, but been unable to connect with them due to kitchen servicing issues at the Grateful Diner, a job fair to hire staff for Mesa Luna, and a series of sessions with wine distributors to craft the Mesa Luna wine list. They are telling fans that Sam is work-ing to finalize the opening menu, but has designed a line-up that will consist of a lot of small plates, salads, and full or half-size entree options. The target for open-ing in the former Soe Cafe space is late this month. Soe Cafe closed up shop around Labor Day last year and the space was used for a series of “Pop Up” offerings over several weekends this winter by Chef Brandon Blatzley who is opening the new TMIP Restaurant in LaPorte County, Indiana later this spring. Stay tuned for additional information on the return of Mesa Luna to Harbor Country at 12868 Red Arrow Highway in Sawyer. Advance Products Corporation of Benton Harbor has sold its automation division to a Grandville , Michigan manufacturer in order to focus Toss Winter OUT. 234 Fresh Carpet In Stock. Continued on page 12 room size remnants up to 50% OFF Continued on page 11 on its consumable line of products for the die-casting maintaining the quality of the Advance Automation industry . Industrial Innovations , a manufacturer of brand.” Advance Products has been in business locally industrial lubrication equipment for operation in metal-for 66-years now. Industrial Innovations has been in working industries, has acquired the automation divi-business for 30-years, and recently relocated to sion which is known for its die casting solutions. The Grandville from the Grand Rapids suburb of Wyoming. resulting entity will be known as Advance Automation Troy Turnbull is President of Industrial Innovations. and will be branded as “an Industrial Innovations He says, “This acquisition leverages the best solutions Company.” All operations are being consolidated into a of both companies to deliver a higher level of capability M ,T ,W ,F 9-5 , Dormax St. SW in to our customers.” He adds, “With this depth of product new 20,000 square foot site at 2936 and application experience, we can be a one-stop shop Grandville, outside of Grand Rapids . Thursday 9-7 , John Kraklau is President of Advance Products for automation and lubrication solutions across the die casting, foundry and metalworking industries.” The Saturday 10-3 Corporation. He says, “As a family-owned business 2467 S. M139 Benton Automation Harbor product line of the Advance transitioning to the next generation, we made an addition 1/4 Mile N. of Innovations’ I94 Exit 28 expands Industrial existing lubrication informed decision to concentrate on the sales of our Located in the former Tile footprint Mart Building Be proud of your floor. management solutions within both the consumable line.” The company, located at 2527 N. M-63 in Hagar Township , will continue to be a leader die-casting and foundry industries. Advance has been in consumable products for the die casting industry. serving the industry since 1948 and has a strong cus-Kraklau adds, “Going forward, we believe that tomer base using its reciprocating die sprayers, servo Industrial Innovations, with its extensive lubrication ladlers, robot extractors, temperature control systems management experience, will do an excellent job of and die spray and plunger tip lubricating systems. Industrial Innovations has been providing industrial MailMax is a publication of Far Ahead Advertising, Inc. lubrication systems to the metal forming, machining, 2202 Plaza Drive Benton Harbor, MI 49022 stamping and die casting industries for over 30-years. The company is known for its SPRA-RITE brand and comprehensive approach to lubrication solution devel-FAX: 269.934.3297 opment, supported by the effective engineering princi-ples, reliable components and quality construction of its email: publisher@farahead.com Inserts may vary by Zip Code equipment. www.MailMaxOnline.com •www.facebook.com/eMailMax Terms of the sale and acquisition were not dis-closed by the parties involved. Two dynamic young marketing professionals in the region have created a new firm of their own bring-and roll balances MOODY Continued from page 11 Rolls In Stock of Outdoor carpet 8 Patterns 20-40% OFF Retail New arrivals of Shaw nylon patterned carpet Tile • Stone • Carpet • Remnants • Area Rugs • Hardwood • Glass Tiles • Laminate Flooring 269.925.2900 www.FloorArtWorld.com Inserts & Promotions Phone: 269.934.7522 • Harding’s Friendly Markets • Martins Super Market c H o M M i w o s t m w f e n t m s m w c m t v h i B i n J w b

Moody On The Market

Pat Moody

After "eight incredible years," the owner and operator of a boutique winery on a 65-acre estate in Buchanan will "press the pause button on our winemaking.” With five vintages under their belt, Vintners David Maki and Dannielle Alphonse and Winemaker Cornel Olivier are stepping back from winemaking at Old Shore Vineyards as they “take time to digest next steps.” Old Shore Vineyard first planted the vines eight years ago at the farmstead and vineyards on a 65-acre estate at 264 Browntown Road in Buchanan. In 2006 the vineyard was established with the planting of 7,000 Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir vines. In a Facebook post on the evening of April 15th, David & Dannielle announced to friends and fans the decision. Their statement said, “What a joy it has been to be part of such an incredible industry and share our passions and labor of love with each of you. Eight years ago, when planting the vines of Old Shore, we couldn’t have dreamed of a more memorable experience ahead. Beginning with the mentorship from our peers in the Michigan wine industry and beyond, to the pursuit of viticulture and enology education -- each experience has invigorated us from the ground up. With five vintages under our belt, we have made the decision to press the pause button on our winemaking. The vineyards will continue to be in full-swing as we take time to digest next steps. We will continue to support the Michigan wine industry, its growth, and our peers who are dedicated to produce premium wines within our state. Old Shore is proud to have made a positive imprint with our boutique, smalllot productions during this critical industry growth period and remain passionate about the future! Thank you, OSV friends, for your loyal support over the years and for bringing Old Shore wine to your table. It has been an honor to experience this journey with you. Be inspired. Go explore.” Old Shore has a very small quantity of the 2011 vintage left and they are also releasing their last boutique production; the 2012 vintage. Driven by the “pause button,” they are offering 20% of on all 2011 vintage full-case purchases and 10% off full-case purchases of the newly released 2012 wines. It could be your final opportunity to purchase. Here is a link to their online sales opportunity: https://www.wineweb. com/scripts/secure/order.cfm/oldshore<br /> <br /> The Harbor Country restaurant once characterized by one of its owners as “A four-year dinner party,” will re-emerge anew in the coming weeks, to re-fill a popular hole in the culinary line-up of Sawyer that once was the Soe Cafe. It will then complement its sister property, the Grateful Diner. Hang on, because this will get a bit complicated. Back in the beginning, a place called Mesa Luna, owned and operated by Chef Sam Luna and his wife Denise, took over the space once home to The Grille on Elm at 13 S. Elm Street in downtown Three Oaks. Their new offering at that time introduced Three Oaks to an exciting, but pricey, and eclectic menu that capitalized on local growers and providers for a true farm-to-table experience. That was back in 2005 and 2006. Eventually, the restaurant proved to be a little too-much of a fine dining experience for a small town, and the couple bailed on the concept after what Denise jokingly called “a four year dinner party,” to make way for a different dream. About a year-and-a-half ago, Chef Sam and Denise returned to the scene with the Grateful Diner, a tiny, but bright and colorful eatery and catering business at 801 W. Buffalo Street in New Buffalo. Serving breakfast and lunch exclusively, Team Luna is striving to maintain their roots by working to stay as local as possible in the farmto- table genre. As Denise told the Harbor Country News early last year, the Grateful Diner is not only a tribute to Sam’s favorite band, but it’s also a nod to their gratitude for the sun, seed, soil, farmers, lake and customers that make such a diner possible. Now that they have settled into a groove at the Diner, Sam & Denise are capitalizing on the departure late last summer of the Soe Cafe in Sawyer to round out their service with a dinner restaurant. When they’re not busy working the Diner, they and their colleagues are busy piecing together plans for the return of Mesa Luna. It appears that chapter two for Mesa Luna will be largely dinner service and weekend brunch plans. I’ve been tracking their online postings, but been unable to connect with them due to kitchen servicing issues at the Grateful Diner, a job fair to hire staff for Mesa Luna, and a series of sessions with wine distributors to craft the Mesa Luna wine list. They are telling fans that Sam is working to finalize the opening menu, but has designed a line-up that will consist of a lot of small plates, salads, and full or half-size entree options. The target for opening in the former Soe Cafe space is late this month. Soe Cafe closed up shop around Labor Day last year and the space was used for a series of “Pop Up” offerings over several weekends this winter by Chef Brandon Blatzley who is opening the new TMIP Restaurant in LaPorte County, Indiana later this spring. Stay tuned for additional information on the return of Mesa Luna to Harbor Country at 12868 Red Arrow Highway in Sawyer.<br /> <br /> Advance Products Corporation of Benton Harbor has sold its automation division to a Grandville, Michigan manufacturer in order to focus on its consumable line of products for the die-casting industry. Industrial Innovations, a manufacturer of industrial lubrication equipment for operation in metalworking industries, has acquired the automation division which is known for its die casting solutions. The resulting entity will be known as Advance Automation and will be branded as “an Industrial Innovations Company.” All operations are being consolidated into a new 20,000 square foot site at 2936 Dormax St. SW in Grandville, outside of Grand Rapids.<br /> <br /> John Kraklau is President of Advance Products Corporation. He says, “As a family-owned business transitioning to the next generation, we made an informed decision to concentrate on the sales of our consumable line.” The company, located at 2527 N. M-63 in Hagar Township, will continue to be a leader in consumable products for the die casting industry. Kraklau adds, “Going forward, we believe that Industrial Innovations, with its extensive lubrication management experience, will do an excellent job of maintaining the quality of the Advance Automation brand.” Advance Products has been in business locally for 66-years now. Industrial Innovations has been in business for 30-years, and recently relocated to Grandville from the Grand Rapids suburb of Wyoming. Troy Turnbull is President of Industrial Innovations. He says, “This acquisition leverages the best solutions of both companies to deliver a higher level of capability to our customers.” He adds, “With this depth of product and application experience, we can be a one-stop shop for automation and lubrication solutions across the die casting, foundry and metalworking industries.” The addition of the Advance Automation product line expands Industrial Innovations’ existing lubrication management solutions footprint within both the die-casting and foundry industries. Advance has been serving the industry since 1948 and has a strong customer base using its reciprocating die sprayers, servo ladlers, robot extractors, temperature control systems and die spray and plunger tip lubricating systems. Industrial Innovations has been providing industrial lubrication systems to the metal forming, machining, stamping and die casting industries for over 30-years. The company is known for its SPRA-RITE brand and comprehensive approach to lubrication solution development, supported by the effective engineering principles, reliable components and quality construction of its equipment. <br /> <br /> Terms of the sale and acquisition were not disclosed by the parties involved.<br /> <br /> Two dynamic young marketing professionals in the region have created a new firm of their own bringing a tremendous amount of talent to the table for prospective new clients everywhere. Patrick Bosse and Dave Holt are Co-Founders of the new Holt Bosse, full-service marketing firm that has taken up residence in a business incubator building that was the long-time home to one of the most successful such firms in the history of Michigan’s Great Southwest. Holt Bosse is a hybrid agency that splices traditional marketing with experiential marketing to enchant their customers and increase word-of-mouth referrals, according to Mr. Bosse. Says Patrick, “We look at the ways a business can turn their customer-base into a 24/7 sales force.” He brings great experience to the table having worked on national brands such as La-Z-Boy, UPS Stores, and Mazda in his previous roles with firms in Southeast Michigan and here in the region. He adds, “Instead of interrupting people with messages we want them to see, we apply our creative and strategic skills to the product or service which they’re already using. Basically, we show them how wonderful something is, instead of telling them.” While Holt Bosse handles a full range of marketing needs, such as brochures, advertising and websites, experiential marketing plays a vital role in the firm’s creative solutions. Experiential marketing focuses on how a product or service is experienced, which is not only engaging for customers, but also cost-effective, according to Co-Founder Dave Holt. Dave tells me, “When customers are engaged in your product and service, marketing takes on a new shape.” He adds, “As marketers, we look for ways to create and amplify word-of-mouth referrals. It’s not only incredibly cost-effective, but a message from a friend is much more relevant than a message from a company...It’s trusted. Messages from companies, however, are viewed with a heavy dose of skepticism.” Holt Bosse has established a base of operations at 526 Upton Drive in St. Joseph, the longtime home to the former Perry Ballard, Incorporated where Mr. Bosse worked before it became FATHOM Works last year and moved to new quarters atop The Box Factory for the Arts in St. Joseph. He began his career on the east side of the state working at Doner as a media planner on national brands like La-Z-Boy, UPS Stores, BF Goodrich and Mazda. He moved to Michigan’s Great Southwest where he has been able to hone his strategy and media talents with a number of clients from a wide variety of industries. Mr. Holt has more than a dozen years of experience in UX design, online marketing and analysis. In that time, he has been recognized five times by regional and national organizations for interactive work and has continually held Google Analytics certification since 2010. Dave is a former journalist and illustrator who has been acknowledged on two different occasions by the Associated Press -- once for writing, the other for photo illustration. Patrick’s departure from FATHOM Works is not only amicable, he will still align with his old firm on some projects. By way of example, he will be handling all of the Lighthouse Forever Fund work he has been instrumental in developing for the committee with FATHOM. You will find Holt Bosse’s new offices at 526 Upton Drive East in St. Joseph and they can be reached by phone at 269-932-3623. Online you can find them at www.HoltBosse.com. <br /> <br /> When Goodwill Industries of Southwestern Michigan converted a former retail electronics store at Mall Drive and Cinema Way in Benton Charter Township, some skeptics wondered aloud if such a re-use of that building was practical and whether the shop would survive in that district. Not only has the Goodwill center survived, it has teemed and thrived at that site for years now. The success of that operation has led to creation of a satellite boutique shop in the heart of downtown Stevensville. Goodwill Industries of Southwestern Michigan will celebrate the Grand Opening of their Stevensville Retail Boutique on Friday morning, May 2nd, 2014 at 10:00am. The street address is 5709 St. Joseph Avenue...at the corner of John Beers Road and St. Joseph Avenue. This new boutique will spotlight upscale women’s clothing and accessories as well as special items like handmade soaps, antiques & collectibles, a great book selection and new goods. The boutique will also offer the same new and used clothing, glassware, shoes and other items found at traditional Goodwill Industries of SW Michigan Retail Outlets and will serve as a donation center. Regular hours of operation at the new Stevensville site will be Monday through Saturday from 10am until 6pm. A ribbon cutting ceremony will be conducted on May 2nd at 10am and customers will be invited to enter a drawing for a $50 Goodwill Gift Card. This addition to the Goodwill line-up will bring the total number of retail locations bearing the Goodwill banner to ten in a six-county area. Shoppers can also find Goodwill collectibles and designer items online at www.shopgoodwill.com. Goodwill Industries of Southwestern Michigan is all about people working. They provide employment, education, training, and support services to individuals and families so they can achieve self-sufficiency. Revenue from retail sales provides individual wages, job training and other services that prepare people for employment success. In the end, these funds are channeled back into the community in the form of taxes paid and the purchase of goods and services.<br /> <br /> That’s it for this week. See you next week right here in MailMax and online 24/7 at www.MoodyOnTheMarket.com.<br /> <br /> Pat Moody<br /> Morning Radio Personality<br /> WSJM Radio<br /> moody@wsjm.com<br /> (269) 925-1111

Floor Art

 

Loading